Dr. Madeline Meier, of the famous IQ and marijuana study, responds to new IQ study

A writer with Washington Post‘s online blog, Wonkblog, who has a history of pro-marijuana leaning articles, recently published a story called, “No, marijuana use doesn’t lower your IQ”

The article goes on to question the association between marijuana and IQ based on findings from the ASLPAC study just released. We asked Dr. Madeline Meier, now at ASU, who co-authored the now famous Dunedin study showing a significant reduction in IQ among heavy adolescent marijuana users, about the Wonkblog accusations. Here was her reply:

“This new paper looks interesting. It does not relate in any way to our findings from the Dunedin Study, however.

Our finding was that adults who were long-term dependent on cannabis and those who used cannabis 4 or more times per week during the 20 years after adolescence, had lost IQ points by age 38. Those who lost the most IQ points were those who had started their cannabis use youngest, as teens.

There is no reason to expect that teens who have used cannabis only 50 times would already show a loss of IQ points by age 15. The ALSPAC study would need at least 20 more years of follow up, and data on cannabis dependence, before it could be compared to the Dunedin Study.”

Where are marijuana stores allowed in CO?

Nine cities in Colorado allow recreational marijuana sales, including the first and third largest cities by population (Denver and Aurora) and 23 cities prohibit or have moratoria on recreational sales.  However, using the 2010 census data and this map, about 1.1 million citizens live in cities where recreational sales are allowed whereas about 1.4 million live in cities without recreational marijuana sales. A few smaller cities may not be included in the prohibited total.  Population changes since 2010 likely cause some inaccuracy in these numbers.
CoCities
Not everyone in Colorado, even in this heavily populated area, has bought in to Amendment 64, especially as we continue to see the negative effects.

Major National Poll Finds Support for Legalization Down 10% Since 2013

Major National Poll Finds Support for Legalization Down 10% Since 2013

Public Religion Research Institute Poll, funded by the Ford Foundation and the Nathan Cummings Foundation, finds only 44% of Americans now support legalization, down from 51% in 2013. Opposition at 50%.

WASHINGTON- Coming off of a Suffolk University/USA Today poll finding only 46% of Coloradans support legalization now, a new report released just now finds that in a survey of over 4,500 adults, only 44% support marijuana legalization. 50% of Americans oppose it, including 24% who strongly oppose such a policy.

 

“Legalization is not a done deal – far from it,” remarked Kevin A. Sabet, President of Smart Approaches to Marijuana (SAM). “People are waking up and realizing that legalization in practice does not represent the magic policy they were promised.”

 

Polls in Alaska and elsewhere also find diminished support. Reports from Colorado are finding that revenue projections were grossly overestimated, and the public is experiencing increased health and safety consequences driven by the marijuana industry.

 

The margin of error for the survey is +/- 1.8 percentage points at the 95% level of
confidence. The survey was designed and conducted by Public Religion Research Institute and funded by the Ford Foundation and the Nathan Cummings Foundation. Results of
the survey were based on bilingual (Spanish and English) RDD telephone interviews
conducted between July 21, 2014 and August 15, 2014 by professional interviewers
under the direction of SSRS, a full-service survey research firm. Interviews were
conducted among a random sample of 4,507 adults 18 years of age or older living in
the United States (2,253 respondents were interviewed on a cell phone).
Data collection is based on stratified, single-stage, random-digit-dialing (RDD)
sample of landline telephone households and randomly generated cell phone
numbers. The sample is designed to represent the total U.S. adult population
covering respondents from all 50 states, including Hawaii and Alaska. The landline
and cell phone samples are provided by Marketing Systems.

 

Project SAM, has four main goals:

* To inform public policy with the science of today’s potent marijuana.

* To prevent the establishment of “Big Marijuana” – and a 21st-Century tobacco industry that would market marijuana to children.

* To promote research of marijuana’s medical properties and produce, non-smoked, non-psychoactive pharmacy-attainable medications.

* To have an adult conversation about reducing the unintended consequences of current marijuana policies, such as lifelong stigma due to arrest.

About Project SAM

Project SAM is a nonpartisan alliance of lawmakers, scientists and other concerned citizens who want to move beyond simplistic discussions of “incarceration versus legalization” when discussing marijuana use, and instead focus on a “health-first” policy that neither demonizes nor legalizes the drug. SAM supports tackling mental health treatment and stopping the next “Big Tobacco” in the form of “Big Marijuana.” SAM is supported by a world renowned science advisory board and has affiliates in 27 states.

Colorado Voters Turning Against Marijuana Legalization

Colorado Voters Turning Against Marijuana Legalization

Suffolk University/USA Today poll finds support for legalization plummets 17% among Colorado voters

DENVER– In the first indication of a backlash brewing in Colorado against legal pot, a Suffolk University/USA Today poll finds that now only 46% of likely voters support Amendment 64, the constitutional amendment legalizing and commercializing marijuana. 50% of likely voters oppose the measure entirely. That is a marked difference from election night 2012, when 55% of voters supported the measure. Even fewer people – 42% of likely voters – approve with the way the state is handling the legal change.

 

“We have always believed that when voters were given the facts about marijuana, the marijuana industry, and the failings of commercialization, they would oppose legalization.  It is unfortunate Colorado has been the lab rat of the marijuana industry, but we’re confident legalization will only be temporary as opposition to legalization grows and our education of people across the state increases,” said Bob Doyle, Chair, Colorado SAM Coalition.

 

Colorado has grown into a massive opportunity for marijuana businesses, who sell candy, chocolate, and other kid-friendly marijuana items. This has led to a rise in poison center calls and emergency room admissions.

 

“The theory of legalization looks a lot prettier than the policy in practice,” remarked Kevin A. Sabet, President of Smart Approaches to Marijuana (SAM). “Revenue numbers are low, the underground market is thriving, and health issues are mounting. And, it appears, the public is paying attention.”

 

Project SAM, has four main goals:

  • To inform public policy with the science of today’s potent marijuana.
  • To prevent the establishment of “Big Marijuana” — and a 21st-Century tobacco industry that would market marijuana to children.
  • To promote research of marijuana’s medical properties and produce, non-smoked, non-psychoactive pharmacy-attainable medications.
  • To have an adult conversation about reducing the unintended consequences of current marijuana policies, such as lifelong stigma due to arrest.

About Project SAM

Project SAM is a nonpartisan alliance of lawmakers, scientists and other concerned citizens who want to move beyond simplistic discussions of “incarceration versus legalization” when discussing marijuana use and instead focus on practical changes in marijuana policy that neither demonizes users nor legalizes the drug. Project SAM has affiliates in 27 states, including Washington, Oregon, New York, California, Colorado, Vermont, Hawaii, Massachusetts, Missouri, and other jurisdictions.